8 CHANGES TO THE HIGHWAY CODE THAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Rules for all types of road users will be updated in The Highway Code to improve the safety of people walking, cycling and riding horses.
The changes will be made to The Highway Code from 29 January 2022.

There are changes in 8 important areas:

  • introducing a new hierarchy of road users
  • crossing the road at junctions
  • walking, cycling or riding in shared spaces
  • positioning in the road when cycling
  • overtaking when driving or cycling
  • cycling at junctions
  • people cycling, riding horses and driving horse-drawn vehicles on roundabouts
  • parking, charging and leaving vehicles
Find out what’s changing
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2022 CPC DATES – GLOUCESTERSHIRE

DATE VENUE COURSE TITLE
5th February Gloucestershire Fully Booked First person on the scene of accident / Health & Safety
12th February Weston Sub Edge Vulnerable road users / Highway Code
15th February Weston Sub   Edge Digital Tachographs / Driver essentials 1   drivers hours
19th February Weston Sub Edge Driver Essentials 2 Scheduling  / Delivering the goods
25th February Gloucestershire Fully Booked Driver Wellbeing / Know your Vehicle and Load
26th February Gloucestershire Fully Booked Vulnerable Road Users / Highway Code
3rd March Weston Sub Edge Licences  O Licences / A Drivers Day
5th March Weston Sub Edge First Person on The Scene of Accident / Highway Code
12th March Weston Sub Edge Vulnerable Road Users / Health & Safety
19th March Weston Sub Edge Drivers Essentials 1 drivers hours /  Delivering the Goods
22nd March Weston sub Edge Digital Tachographs / Driver essentials 2 scheduling
26th March Hook Norton Fully Booked Know your Vehicle and Load /  Health & Safety
2nd April Weston Sub Edge Driver wellbeing / Vulnerable Road Users
9th April Weston Sub Edge A Drivers Day / Highway Code
20th April Weston Sub Edge Licences O Licences / First person on the Scene of accident
23rd April Hook Norton Fully Booked Vulnerable road users / Driver Essentials 1 Drivers hours
30th April Weston Sub Edge Driver essentials 2 scheduling /
3rd September Weston Sub Edge First person on the scene of accident / Health & Safety
14th September Weston Sub Edge Vulnerable road users / Highway Code
17th September TBC Digital Tachographs / Driver essentials 1   drivers hours
20th September Weston Sub Edge Driver Essentials 2 Scheduling  / Delivering the goods
24th September Weston Sub Edge Driver Wellbeing / Know your Vehicle and Load
1st October TBC Vulnerable Road Users / Highway Code
5th October Weston Sub Edge Licences  O Licences / A Drivers Day
15th October Weston Sub Edge First Person on The Scene of Accident / Highway Code
18th October Weston Sub Edge Vulnerable Road Users / Health & Safety
22nd October Weston Sub Edge Drivers Essentials 1 drivers hours /  Delivering the Goods
5th November Weston Sub Edge Digital Tachographs / Driver essentials 2 scheduling
8th November Weston Sub Edge Know your Vehicle and Load /  Health & Safety
12th November TBC Driver wellbeing / Vulnerable Road Users
19th November Weston Sub Edge A Drivers Day / Highway Code
22nd November Weston Sub Edge Licences  O Licences / A Drivers Day
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Changes to The Highway Code: hierarchy of road users

From 29 January rules for all types of road users will be updated in The Highway Code to improve the safety of people walking, cycling and riding horses.

As a professional driver or operator, it is vital that you stay up to date with The Highway Code, checking it regularly to understand how changes affect you and your business.

New hierarchy of road users
The changes being made by the Government on 29 January introduce a new ‘hierarchy of road users’. The new hierarchy explains that those in charge of vehicles that can cause the greatest harm in the event of a collision bear the greatest responsibility to take care and reduce the danger they pose to others.

This principle applies most strongly to drivers of large goods and passenger vehicles, cars and motorcycles.

Other more vulnerable road users have a responsibility to reduce danger to people walking . None of this detracts from the responsibility of ALL road users, including people walking, cycling or riding a horse, to have regard for their own and other road users’ safety.

You can read more about these changes on GOV.UK.

Changes at a glance

The latest changes to The Highway Code include:

Giving people walking across and people cycling going straight ahead priority when turning in and out of junctions
Leaving at least 1.5 metres when overtaking people cycling at speeds of up to 30mph, and give them more space when overtaking at higher speeds.
Passing people riding a horse or driving a horse-drawn vehicle at speeds under 10 mph and allow at least 2 metres of space
Allowing at least 2 metres of space and keep to a low speed when passing a person who is walking in the road
Encouraging people driving vehicles to open their doors with the hand furthest from the door, to help them look over their shoulder behind them to see people cycling or walking nearby
People cycling may ride in the centre of the road or two abreast for their own safety, whilst allowing others to overtake when it is safe for them to do so

Why staying up to date is important

It’s important that everyone understands their responsibility for the safety of other road users.

Many of the rules in the code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you’re committing a criminal offence.

If you do not follow the other rules in the code, it can be used in evidence in court proceedings to establish liability.

How to stay updated
It’s easy to keep up to date with The Highway Code, and any other future changes, online.

GOV.UK includes a list of the latest updates that have been made, so it’s quick and easy to see what has changed. You can also sign up for email alerts whenever The Highway Code is updated.

The Highway Code on GOV.UK allows you to:

search for key words and phrases within The Highway Code
quickly move between related rules
follow links to the original laws that the rules are based on
print sections more easily
There’s also an official Highway Code app.

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Changes to how you move goods between Great Britain and the EU from 1 January 2022

From 1 January 2022, any goods moved between Great Britain and the EU, except for the island of Ireland, will require full customs controls.

Moving goods from the island of Ireland to Great Britain
On 15 December, the Government announced that from 1 January, goods moving from the island of Ireland to Great Britain, including those moving from Northern Ireland via Irish Ports, will continue to be treated the same way as they are now. There will be no new requirements in terms of either customs or SPS processes.

Moving goods from Great Britain to EU
You’ll need to check that the business whose goods you’re moving has submitted the correct export declaration. This would be a pre-lodged export declaration or an arrived export declaration.

Check which locations need an arrived export declaration.

If you’re leaving from the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel, make sure the dual Freight Location Code is used on the export declaration for the goods you’re moving. This will give you flexibility for your route. Check the location codes for roll on roll off border locations for use in CDS or CHIEF.

Moving goods from the EU to Great Britain
You’ll need to check with the EU exporter that they have completed the EU export procedures.

You’ll also need to get evidence from the Great Britain importer that the correct import declaration has been made. This would be a pre-lodged import declaration or a simplified frontier declaration.

Check which locations need a pre-lodged import declaration.

Drivers will not be able to board the ferry or shuttle if they do not have the required paperwork for the goods with them from 1 January.

You can find more information about the new requirements for moving goods between Great Britain and the EU in the Haulier Handbook.

Moving goods through border locations that use GVMS
If you will be moving goods through border locations that use the Goods Vehicle Movement Service (GVMS) to control goods from 1 January, you must:

Register for GVMS now. You will need to use this system to create a goods movement reference (GMR) for any goods you move between GB and the EU.
Get a GMR. Any movements (including empties) into Great Britain from the EU, or to the EU from Great Britain, started after 11.59pm GMT on 31 December 2021 must have a GMR. Without one, drivers will not be able to board the ferry or shuttle. To help you prepare, you can create a GMR from 29 December 2021.
Check if you need to report for an inspection of your goods using your GMR. If the goods you’re importing or exporting are selected for inspection, most ports will check the goods on site. Port of Dover and Eurotunnel require drivers to attend an inland border facility (IBF), as does Holyhead if you’re exporting goods from Great Britain.
The person who created the GMR (usually the haulier) must ensure the goods arrive at an IBF for a check and that their drivers are made aware, or have the means to check, if an inspection is required. The haulier and/or driver may be liable to a penalty of up to £2,500 if they fail to follow HMRC instructions to attend an IBF.

Support available
Check GOV.UK for more information, but if you need more help on these requirements, you can call the Customs and International Trade helpline on 0300 322 9434 from 8am to 10pm Monday to Friday, and 8am to 4pm at weekends, or contact us by webchat.

CIT helpline Christmas and New Year opening hours:

24 December: 8am to 10pm
25-28 December: closed
29-31 December: 8am to 10pm
1-3 January: 8am to 4pm
4 January onwards: normal opening hours
Out of hours service
We understand if you have an issue at the border you need urgent help. HMRC has a 24/7 critical importing and exporting service, through the Customs and International Trade helpline which will be available throughout the Christmas period.

From 1 January 2022, the helpline will also cover GVMS enquiries. Simply choose option 1 when you call.

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Important information for operators of light goods vehicles that travel to the EU

From 21 May 2022, operators or users of vans or other light goods vehicles over 2.5 tonnes and up to 3.5 tonnes in weight for hire and reward will need to obtain an International Operator’s Licence.

This includes a requirement to appoint a designated transport manager with a valid Transport Manager Certificate of Professional Competence (TM CPC) qualification.

This new requirement is part of the UK/EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

A temporary exemption may be available from the TM CPC requirement for those with appropriate experience of managing light goods vehicles in the form of temporary transport manager status.

Find out more about becoming a transport manager.
You will need to list the name of a qualified transport manager in your application for an operator licence. Applications for operator licences will be taken from March 2022.

Apply to be a temporary transport manager
From today, people who can demonstrate they have been continuously managing light goods vehicles for at least 10 years prior to 20 August 2020 can apply to be a temporary transport manager, allowing them to continue to manage light goods vehicles until 21 May 2025.

You can apply now on GOV.UK.
You can find more information on how to apply and what you need on GOV.UK.

This will help businesses ensure that experienced existing fleet managers have time to achieve the necessary TM CPC qualification.

We will be accepting applications for this certificate until 21 May 2024.

Be ready for driver postings from 2 February
From 2 February 2022, if you operate loaded goods journeys in and between European member states, you may also need to share information digitally about your journeys in the EU.

This includes details of the operator, driver, driver employment, dates of travel, and the vehicle used.

Find out whether this new requirement also applies to you, and sign up for updates.

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Securing loads and maintaining safe roads

Road users will often concentrate on the hazards in front of them. But for vehicles pulling heavy loads, it’s often the hazard behind that’s the greatest threat.

Ensuring loads are secure is vital for road user safety and it’s really important that you, as operators and drivers follow the guidance.

Pulling a load over 40 tons, combined with an unsecured load with considerable height and the permitted speed on the UK’s road network, can create an incredibly dangerous combination.

Hauling heavy goods is a serious responsibility and if it goes wrong, it can have serious consequences, that can and has ended in the loss of life.

While we know the vast majority of you know this and take the issue seriously, there’s still a significant threat caused by the small portion of drivers who don’t. Our enforcement teams prohibited just shy of 1,000 vehicles that were clearly insecurely loaded between April 2018 and April 2019. If we could see that, so could those drivers.

Think about an average road journey, and the countless vehicles you pass to put that figure into horrifying context. Especially when you consider the consequences…

Guidance for drivers and operators on load security
In 2013, there were 22,000 road collisions in England due to objects falling from vehicles. We responded to this, by creating a video and guide to support vehicle operators and drivers transport loads securely. We updated our online guidance as recently as November 2020.

But, it’s not only on the roads that load issues can cause problems. Items falling out of vehicles during unloading are a serious risk. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that workplace transport accounts for over half of all death or injury incidents reported. A risk that isn’t worth taking.

While the guidance is clear and our enforcement teams are patrolling to keep Britain’s roads safe, we are still seeing incidents with devastating consequences.

Check your load is secured before setting off
As the video shows, when you load a vehicle, you should ask yourself whether the load can:

slide forwards, backwards or sideways
topple over/fall or make it unstable
become loose in transit
If any of the above could happen, you’ll need to use load restraints. Relying on friction to secure a load is not enough.

Damage control
While the chief concern is for the safety of other road users, there is also the question of cost. Any load that is damaged in transit will come with a cost to the consumer hoping to use your load, the supplier, and an operator who may well have to foot the bill. This will cause disruption to people’s everyday lives.

Devastating consequences
Consider the impact an accident will have on you as the operator or driver. There is a possibility of prosecution, damaged reputation, and lost contracts. Above all, the weight of feeling responsible for injuries or in the very worst cases, someone’s life, can be devastating.

Taking those extra moments to make sure your load is secure will keep your cargo and other road users safe whilst also reducing the risk of being stopped by enforcement officers.

What we’re doing
We’re working with industry stakeholders on load security to make sure that their input and experience feeds into the guidance we create. They provide us with information on the latest solutions on safely securing loads and highlight problems as they become aware of them. This helps us maintain our focus firmly on the latest in load security safety.

We encourage you to be a leader in your industry and promote safe practices in the interests of all road users.

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DRIVER CPC NEW DATES

Tuesday April 20th – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Saturday 8th May – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Wednesday 19th May – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Saturday 5th June – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Tuesday 7th September – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Tuesday 21st September – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Saturday 25th September – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Tuesday 5th October – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Saturday 9th October – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Tuesday 19th October – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Saturday 23rd October – Weston sub edge Village Hall

Tea / Coffee / breakfast included.

All Covid-19 policies, procedures and risk assessments in place …. if you do feel ill on the day, please stay at home.

Please bring a face covering with you, we can supply a face mask if you should forget it.

Please remember to socially distance whilst waiting to register.

Please ring 07733 326777 or email sjlautomotivesolutions@hotmail.co.uk to book your place.

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Changes to regulations based on the review/consultation about amendments to Driver CPC

The main changes are:

  • Drivers should complete 7 hours of training a year.
  • They should not repeat the same course unless there is a specific need.
  • If DVSA believe a training provider knowingly allowed a driver to repeat courses, they may revoke the driver’s periodic training hours, or their Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (DQC) card.
  • Courses can include a maximum of 2 hours e-learning per 7-hour course for drivers to complete prior to attending the classroom or during the classroom sessions, where the other five hours will be delivered.
  • Drivers can now also undergo training based on other transport-related EU Directives that does not hold specific approval as a Driver CPC course.
  • This may include training on the transport of dangerous goods (ADR training taken under Directive 2008/68/EC) and other training yet to be confirmed.

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